The Washington Post

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The paper's headquarters in Washington, D.C. in 2011

The Washington Post is an American daily newspaper. It is the most widely circulated newspaper published in Washington, D.C., and was founded in 1877, making it the area's oldest extant newspaper.

  • In September 2014, the paper published an opinion piece by the Editorial Board advocating against the legalization of marijuana. It said, "... the rush to legalize marijuana gives us — and we hope voters — serious pause. Marijuana, as proponents of legalization argue, may or may not be less harmful than alcohol and tobacco, both legal, but it is not harmless. Questions exist, so it would be prudent for the District not to make a change that could well prove to be misguided until more is known. Foremost here are the experiences and lessons learned by states that have opted for legalization."[1]
  • The following month, the paper published another article by the Editorial Board, called "On marijuana legalization plans, the District should slow down". Excerpt: "We are not in the Reefer Madness school of marijuana prohibition. We favored decriminalization. But the drug can have harmful effects; Its active ingredient has been linked to memory problems, impaired thinking and weakened immune systems. And we question whether it is possible to legalize the drug for adults without sending a message to youth that its use is risk-free... By waiting, the District would benefit from ongoing scientific research as well as the experience of states that only recently have legalized marijuana. It is easier to let a genie out of the bottle than to try to stuff one back in."[2]

Related

Additional Resources

References

  1. D.C. voters should reject the rush to legalize marijuana by Editorial Board (September 2014), The Washington Post. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  2. On marijuana legalization plans, the District should slow down by Editorial Board (October 21, 2014), The Washington Post. Retrieved October 24, 2014.